Confucius, Lao Tzu and Chinese philosophy

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The golden age of Chinese philosophy dates from the birth of Confucius (551 BC) until China was unified (and learning suppressed) in 221 BC. China's great Confucian philosophers were Confucius, Mengzi, and Xunzi. With a few exceptions, Confucianism has been the reigning paradigm for Chinese philosophy for over 2,000 years. Its central concepts are li (the proper ordering of society through rituals or ceremonies) and zhen (the proper ordering of the self through humaneness, benevolence, and love). Under such masters as Laozi (Lao Tzu) and Zhuangzi, Daoism (also known as Taoism) influenced Chinese thought with its doctrine of yin-yang, which symbolizes the interdependence of opposites (such as male/female, good/evil, etc.). The Dao (Tao) which means "the Way", also involves emptiness, absence, spontaneous action, and forgetting (rather than the rituals, learning, and prescriptive moral and social activities that Confucianism emphasized). The Daoist rejects power and control, instead accepting and ecstatically affirming things as they are. Daoism is a doctrine of nonresistance, of "going with the flow" by being so deeply immersed in an activity that you become one with it. The Daoist concept of enlightenment also helped shape the Chinese philosophy known as Chan Buddhism, which rejects consciousness and self-awareness. The Chan Buddhist gives up on "figuring things out," instead emphasizing meditative exercises and devices such as koans. This philosophy is known in Korea as Son, and in Japan and the West as Zen Buddhism.
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Grouping Information

Grouped Work ID 1975ff0c-d587-cfa8-9572-5c80f83a6d0b
full_title confucius lao tzu and chinese philosophy
author sartwell crispin
grouping_category book
lastUpdate 2017-06-03 04:42:46AM

Solr Details

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auth_author2 Redgrave, Lynn, 1943-2010,, Redgrave, Lynn, 1943-2010.
author Sartwell, Crispin, 1958-
author2-role Redgrave, Lynn,1943-2010,narrator., Redgrave, Lynn,1943-2010.|Narrator, hoopla digital.
author_display Sartwell, Crispin
available_at_catalog Huron Street
detailed_location_catalog Huron Street - Adult CD Audiobooks - Nonfiction
display_description The golden age of Chinese philosophy dates from the birth of Confucius (551 BC) until China was unified (and learning suppressed) in 221 BC. China's great Confucian philosophers were Confucius, Mengzi, and Xunzi. With a few exceptions, Confucianism has been the reigning paradigm for Chinese philosophy for over 2,000 years. Its central concepts are li (the proper ordering of society through rituals or ceremonies) and zhen (the proper ordering of the self through humaneness, benevolence, and love). Under such masters as Laozi (Lao Tzu) and Zhuangzi, Daoism (also known as Taoism) influenced Chinese thought with its doctrine of yin-yang, which symbolizes the interdependence of opposites (such as male/female, good/evil, etc.). The Dao (Tao) which means "the Way", also involves emptiness, absence, spontaneous action, and forgetting (rather than the rituals, learning, and prescriptive moral and social activities that Confucianism emphasized). The Daoist rejects power and control, instead accepting and ecstatically affirming things as they are. Daoism is a doctrine of nonresistance, of "going with the flow" by being so deeply immersed in an activity that you become one with it. The Daoist concept of enlightenment also helped shape the Chinese philosophy known as Chan Buddhism, which rejects consciousness and self-awareness. The Chan Buddhist gives up on "figuring things out," instead emphasizing meditative exercises and devices such as koans. This philosophy is known in Korea as Son, and in Japan and the West as Zen Buddhism.
format_catalog Audio Book, eAudiobook
format_category_catalog Audio Books, eBook
id 1975ff0c-d587-cfa8-9572-5c80f83a6d0b
isbn 9781470886639, 9781481539043
item_details hoopla:MWT10027747||Online Hoopla Collection|Online Hoopla|eAudiobook|Audio Books|1|false|true|Hoopla||https://www.hoopladigital.com/title/10027747||Available Online||||, ils:921182|1271842|Huron Street - Adult CD Audiobooks - Nonfiction|CD PHILOS i|Audio Book|Audio Books|1|false|false|||||On Shelf||ng||
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literary_form Unknown
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local_callnumber_catalog CD PHILOS i
owning_library_catalog All Anythink Libraries
owning_location_catalog Huron Street
primary_isbn 9781481539043
publishDate 2006
record_details hoopla:MWT10027747|eAudiobook|Audio Books|Unabridged.|English|Knowledge Products, Inc. ,|2006.|1 online resource (1 audio file (2hr., 30 min.)) : digital., ils:921182|Audio Book|Audio Books||English|Blackstone Audiobooks, Inc.,|[2006]|3 CDs (approximately 2 hr. 30 min.) : digital ; 4 3/4 in.
recordtype grouped_work
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series Audio classics, World of philosophy
series_with_volume Audio classics, World of philosophy
subject_facet Audiobooks, Confucius, Laozi, PHILOSOPHY / Eastern, Philosophy / History & Surveys / Ancient & Classical, Philosophy, Chinese
title_display Confucius, Lao Tzu and Chinese philosophy
title_full Confucius, Lao Tzu and Chinese philosophy [electronic resource] / Crispin Sartwell, Confucius, Lao Tzu and Chinese philosophy [sound recording] / by professor Crispin Sartwell
title_short Confucius, Lao Tzu and Chinese philosophy
topic_facet Confucius, Laozi, Philosophy, Chinese